For those of you who reminisce about the days of old, when the spectacular Ford Bronco, Chevy Blazer, and Jeep CJ5 ruled the road, fear not!   You can stop worrying about these new crossovers that dominate the market.  There are still purpose-built SUV’s out there like the Jeep Wrangler, Land Rover LR4, etc.  However, if you want a hunk of classic iron, you may need to pay a bit more.  I have ranked 8 classic SUV’s that were built to drive anywhere.  I have included current market prices, and some information about them.

  1. 1960-1984 Toyota Land Cruiser.  While the Land Cruiser has gained weight, features, and technology, it still has that sense of purpose.  You can find one anywhere from Cape Town to your neighbor’s driveway.  That’s how popular the Land Cruiser was in its first iteration in the U.S.  According to Hagerty Car Insurance, the price of classic Land Cruisers has tripled in the past five years.  The current market value for a first-generation Land Cruiser will run you about $31,000.  
  2. 1958-1971 Land Rover Series II.  For almost 10 years, a Land Rover Series II was the first motorized vehicle 60% of the world had ever seen.  These old Land Rovers are so capable that no modification is usually needed/wanted.  Land Rover owners like their Land Rovers stock.  A Land Rover Series II will set you back $26,500, at current market value.
  3. 1966-1977 Ford Bronco.  Ford’s first SUV is an amazing vehicle.  It is extremely capable, yet it is able to be driven daily.  The Bronco was unique for Ford – it didn’t share ANY basic engineering/parts with any other Ford.  Those of you who own one of these old Bronco’s know how hard it used to be to get parts for these Bronco’s.  Currently, a 1966-1977 Bronco is valued at $25,250.  Not too bad, especially for something so capable and cool.
  4. 1971-1985 Land Rover Series III.  The Land Rover Series III is a much more evolved version of the Series II (look above for some information!).  They closely resemble the Series II, but DO NOT get them mixed up!  Collector values for the Series III have jumped 50% in the past three years!  The estimated value for a Land Rover Series III is $22,000.
  5. 1961-1980 International Scout.  Appreciated for its technical simplicity and overall charm, the 1961-1980 International Scout is widely regarded as America’s Land Rover Series II.  The International Scout was originally introduced as a commercial pickup before turning into what is now called an SUV.  The estimated market value is now $19,900.
  6. 1963-1991 Jeep Grand Wagoneer.  A precursor to the modern-day luxury SUV, like the Lexus LX460, the Jeep Grand Wagoneer was targeting those who needed more space than a CJ5, but needed the capability of a Jeep.  It sold in spades.  You can get one in iffy condition for relatively little money, but some sell for far more than the $15,750 that is the current market value.
  7. 1954-1986 Jeep CJ.  Before it became the Jeep Wrangler, it was called the Jeep CJ (Civillian Jeep).  While the original CJ5 was prone to tipping, due to its short wheelbase and high center of gravity, the CJ7 was longer – and more stable.  You can buy one for $15,450.
  8. 1969-1972 Chevrolet Blazer K-5.  The Chevrolet Blazer was based off the rugged C/K-10 pickups offered by Chevrolet and GMC.  It was built to compete with the Ford Bronco.  But, it quickly took the sales lead, thanks to creature comforts like air conditioning and a comfortable interior.  Plus, it had the same off-road capabilities as the Ford Bronco.  The Blazer is relatively affordable, with a market value of $14,400.

These are all great, relatively affordable SUVs.  If you have enough money to buy one, I recommend starting here.

4 thoughts on “Retromania!

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